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Jens Hanssen and Max Weiss

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New Texts Out Now: Jens Hanssen and Max Weiss, eds. Arabic Thought Beyond the Liberal Age: Towards an Intellectual History of the Nahda

Jens Hanssen and Max Weiss, eds. Arabic Thought Beyond the Liberal Age: Towards an Intellectual History of the Nahda. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016. Jadaliyya (J): What made you write this book? Jens Hanssen (JH): The partnership for this project with Max Weiss was born at a workshop in Chicago in April 2011. I had long anticipated the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Albert Hourani’s seminal Arabic Thought In the Liberal Age, 1798-1939. When I ...

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Jens Hanssen is Associate Professor of Arab Civilization, Middle Eastern and modern Mediterranean history at the University of Toronto. In the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations he teaches modern and contemporary Arab intellectual history; the late Ottoman Empire; and the politics of Archaeology. In the Department of History, he teaches settler colonialism in Palestine; liberation struggles, decolonization and counter-insurgency in Asia and Africa; and urban colonialism in the modern Mediterranean. His past book publications include Fin de Siècle Beirut (OUP, 2005); with Max Weiss, Arabic Thought beyond the Liberal Age: Towards an Intellectual History of the Nahda (CUP, 2016). The second CUP volume, Arabic Thought Against the Authoritarian Age, also co-edited with Max Weiss (Princeton), is forthcoming. He is currently co-editing the OUP Handbook of Contemporary Middle Eastern and North African History with Amal Ghazal. He also holds a SSHRC Insight Grant (2014-2018) on German-Jewish Echoes in 20th Arab Thought which has yielded, inter alia, two articles: “Kafka and Arabs” (Critical Inquiry, 2012), and “Translating Revolution: Hannah Arendt and Arab Political Culture”. 

Max Weiss is Associate Professor of History and Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University. He is the author of In the Shadow of Sectarianism: Law, Shi`ism, and the Making of Modern Lebanon (Harvard UP, 2010), co-editor (with Jens Hanssen) of Arabic Thought Beyond the Liberal Age: Towards an Intellectual History of the Nahda (Cambridge UP, 2016) and Arabic Thought Against the Authoritarian Age: Towards an Intellectual History of the Present (Cambridge UP, forthcoming), and translator, most recently, of Mamdouh Azzam, Ascension to Death (London, 2017). He earned a Ph.D. in Modern Middle East History from Stanford University, held postdoctoral fellowships at Princeton University and the Harvard Society of Fellows, and his research has been supported by the Fulbright-Hays Commission, the Social Science Research Council, and the Carnegie Corporation. Currently he is writing about the intellectual and cultural history of modern Syria, and translating several works of modern and contemporary Arabic literature.